Natural Ways to Deal with Gout

Do you know someone who suffers from Gout?

Gout is a disease of uric acid processing and build up. Excess uric acid is converted to sodium urate crystals that settle into joints arid other tissues. Men are more often affected than women and there is some evidence suggesting it may be hereditary. The big toe is a common site for the buildup of urate crystals.

Symptoms include hot joints, inflamed and shiny in color. The body temperature may also rise in acute conditions. It can be very painful swelling of a joint, along with chills and fever. If left unaddressed, it can lead to joint breakdown.

 

Nutrition Support Protocol

Lifestyle Recommendations:

  • Make weight reduction a priority; maintain a healthy body weight.
  • Exercise daily; avoid a sedentary lifestyle.
  • Reduce alcohol intake, particularly beer; stop smoking and increase hydration with plenty of purified water.
  • Moderate consumption of organic coffee may be helpful as coffee may lower uric acid levels.
  • Be aware of potential hypertension or cholesterol issues, which are associated health concerns.
  • Review all current medications while treating gout.
  • Manage stress and reduce excess obligations and any sources of chronic negativity.

 

Dietary Tips:

  • Identify and eliminate any food allergens or intolerances to reduce inflammation.
  • Avoid high fructose corn syrup (especially from sodas and juices) and any refined sugar.
  • Avoid all vegetable and industrial seed oils; avoid over-consuming omega-6 oils; use healthy oils such as olive, coconut, and avocado.
  • Avoid animal proteins that are particularly rich in purines, such as organ meats, shellfish, anchovies and sardines.
  • Eat fewer red meats; prioritize lean meats, cold water fish, and/or beans (if not intolerant).
  • Increase high fiber foods and food rich in magnesium and potassium such as bananas.
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Drink nettle tea.
  • Include apple cider vinegar and tart or black cherry juice in beverage choices; consider using tart cherry juice.

 

Herbs Most Helpful for Gout

  • Stinging Nettle tincture or tea
  • Celery Seed tincture or tea
  • Wild Cherry Bark tincture

Other Herbs to Consider

Tamarack, Black Cohosh, Chamomile, Dandelion, Gravel Root White Willow Bark, St. John’s Wort, Meadowsweet, Burdock Root, Goldenrod, Juniper.

 

Helpful Topical Ideas

  • Diluted essential oil options may include: sage, rosemary
  • Comfrey ointment
  • Epsom salt foot soaks or baths
  • Warm potato poultice

 

Supplements Helpful for Gout

 

Note: This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice from your professional healthcare provider. Please consult your qualified healthcare provider for treatment of medical problems.

ECHINACEA


Latin Name: Echinacea purpurea, E. augustifolia

About Echinacea:

Echinacea, or Purple Coneflower, is a popular garden plant that is also found growing wild.  It was originally named after the hedgehog (Echimus) because of its prickly, cone-like center. The flowers are long lasting and hardy. A favorite of the Native Americans and made popular in 1870 by Dr. H.C. F. Meyer in his original “snake oil” recipe, Echinacea is still widely used today for all kinds of infections. It was traditionally used by the Native Americans for fevers and wounds with difficulty healing.  Today it is widely used and recognized as an antibiotic remedy and immune booster.

This herb may be used external and internally.

How to grow: From seeds, root cuttings. Self-seed.

Safety: Overuse may elevate blood cell counts and diminish therapeutic effects. Do not use if you have autoimmune diseases.

Medicinal Preparations: Decoction, infusion, tincture, oil, salve, mouthwash

Taste: Sweet, cold, tingly, stimulating.
Harvest: Late Fall.
Parts used: Roots (3-4 years old).

MEDICINAL USES:

Immune System: Immune booster, blood cleanser, effective against bacteria and viruses, lymphatic congestion, raises white blood cell count, septic infections with purplish skin or veins, swollen lymph glands, fevers, measles, mumps, chicken pox, colds, flu, strep throat, staph infections, excess mucus, diphtheria, typhoid fever, meningitis.

Respiratory: Upper respiratory tract infections including tonsillitis, laryngitis and nose and sinus issues, bronchitis.

Skin: Acne, boils, carbuncles, abscesses, slow healing wounds, canker sores, eczema, hives.

First Aid: Bee stings, venomous bites, blood poisoning, septic sores and wounds, poison oak, poison ivy.

Digestion: Gastric disorders and ulcers, inflamed intestine.

Additional Uses: Enhances circulation, fatigue, exhaustion and for general “run down” feeling, mouthwash for gingivitis and pyorrhea, mouth sores, ear infection, gangrene.

 

HERBAL ACTIONS

  • Antibiotic
  • Anti-catarrhal
  • Anti-Inflammatory
  • Antiseptic
  • Antiviral
  • Lymphatic

Contains: Glycoside, isobutyalklamines, polyacetylenes, sesquiterpene, resin, volatile oils.

Note: This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice from your professional healthcare provider. Please consult your qualified healthcare provider for treatment of medical problems.

 

Hydration 101

Drinking enough pure water is an important foundation to basic good health. It is one of the easiest, least expensive and most ignored ways to stay healthy.

It’s especially important to add minerals to Reverse Osmosis (RO), distilled, and even some purified bottled waters, because they are often stripped of minerals are needed for out body. This is what most people do not realize. We want our water to be alkaline and full of minerals in order gain the most from it.

 

4 Easy Ways to Re-Mineralize Water

1. Add mineral rich sea salt.

Use an unrefined sea salt like Celtic or Himalayan. Both of these healthy salts contain over 80 important trace minerals we need. You can add just a pinch to a glass of water (it shouldn’t taste salty) or about 1/4 tsp. to a gallon of water. This method is by far the easiest and most economical.

 

2. Add trace mineral drops to your water.

You can purchase various brands of liquid trace minerals and just add it to your water. These types of supplements are an easy way to charge up your water.

 

This energetix product called SpectraMin is an excellent choice. It is available at The Lamb Shoppe.

 

 

 

3. Add various fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices.


Depending on what you add, you can get a nice range of vitamins and minerals this way.

It also makes drinking the water fun. Some examples are lemons, limes, cucumbers, lemon balm, mint, raspberries, ginger root, pomegranates, cinnamon sticks, star anise pods, and so on. Be creative and have fun adding flavors together. I love adding fresh sprigs of lemon balm during the growing season. For the winter months, dried warming herbs are great.

 

 

 

 

4. Add greens powder blends to your water.

 

The green powders are typically made from veggies, herbs, grasses, algae, and grains that are not only full of trace minerals and macro minerals, but other goodies like chlorophyll and vitamins, too. In addition, many blends boast that they provide fiber, prebiotic, probiotic, enzyme, and antioxidants benefits as well. PaleoGreens are my personal favorite.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EVEN BETTER WATER

Connie’s Secret Ingredient #1: REHYDRATION (homeopathic formula by Energetix)

 

 

When the body is not getting sufficient water, after a while it “forgets” how to utilize water properly. Simply drinking more water may not be enough to rehydrate the tissues and cells. Energetix’ ReHydration is specifically designed to remind the body how to use water effectively and efficiently, assisting to reset the mechanisms which regulate fluid balance. Adding ReHydration to water and drinking throughout the day is an excellent way to begin the process of rehydrating the body and getting vital water back into the cells. I highly recommend the product Rehydration. In clinical situations, it really can be effective for the body. That is why I add it to my water daily.

 

Connie’s Secret Ingredient #2: FIELD OF FLOWERS (homeopathic formula by Energetix)

Fields of Flowers, a homeopathic formula, is a unique combination of the 38 traditional flower essences each one long associated with a key element of emotional concern. It restores a sense of calm for people and many people find Field of Flowers beneficial. Stop by The Lamb Shoppe to get a bottle of this today.

 

 

 

Personal Hydration Tips

  • Drink 1–2 glasses of water as soon as you wake up to flush out toxins and hydrate body.
  • Carry clean water with you everywhere and drink anytime you feel like it.
  • Glass containers are best. Plastics leach chemicals.
  • Keep water nearby whenever you are sitting down at a desk and drink while working.
  • Drink purified or filtered water.
  • Drink more if the weather is hot.
  • Add fresh lemon juice to water to alkalize and detox the body.
  • Eat water rich foods. Ex. watermelon is 92% water, tomato 95% water.
  • Drink herbal teas.
  • Instead of snacking in between meals, drink a healthful beverage.
  • Don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink.
  • Try some refreshing probiotic beverages to hydrate your body.

 

Common Symptoms of Dehydration:

  • Headaches
  • Indigestion
  • Constipation
  • Dry or Itchy Skin
  • Grogginess or Tiredness
  • Concentration Lapses
  • Stiff or Sore Muscles or Joints
  • Dark or Cloudy Colored Urine
  • Lower Back Pain

 

Herbs for Winter Health

This winter it seems colds, flus, respiratory issues are hitting many people hard. So here are a seven tips for prevention and also helpful tools if you do get sick so the illness will move through much faster. Be sure to try the easy tea recipes too.

 

1. Eat Warming & Nourishing Foods

As a preventative measure, we first need to look to “winter” types of foods that will nourish our body so it can take care of itself.  These are “warming and nurturing” things to eat to help keep you healthy everyday.

Look for foods rich in vitamin A, C including:
  • root vegetables (carrots, parsnips, beets, etc.)
  • squash & pumpkins
  • brassicas (turnips, cabbage, kale, etc.)
  • greens
  • citrus fruits and rosehips, lemons

 

Eat food from the allium family.

These are vegetables are that are high in sulfur:

  • leeks
  • onion
  • garlic

 

Add warming spices:
  • Ginger
  • Curry
  • Cayenne
  • Turmeric
  • Cinnamon
  • Cardamom

 

2. Use Astragalus.

It is a sweet and mild Chinese root used as an herbal tonic that can be used to build up your resistance. You can find this as a tincture or as a dried herb in the bulk section at the Lamb Shoppe.

We suggest adding the dried root to a pot of soup or when making bone broth.  Astragalus nourishes both the spleen and the lungs

 

3. Calendula Flowers.

Thus is another great item to throw in soups and stews. This herb is also used as an anti-depressant and for people with SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder). Calendula makes a great ointment and salve and is an effective remedy for chapped skins and lips. The Lamb Shoppe has dried Calendula blossoms in the bulk herb section of the store.

 

4. Use Sprigs of Pine, Juniper, Cedar & Sage to Simmer on Stove.

Just having these simple plants simmer on the stove top will freshen and clear the air of germs. Steam inhalations of these plants can be beneficial for relieving congestion in coughs and colds. You can also add a few drops of the essential oil to hot boiled water, place your face over the bowl, cover with a towel, and inhale the steam.

 

5. Build immunity through nutrition and balancing the body.

  • Always work toward avoiding sugar and commercially processed foods.
  • Consume bone broth. You can make your own or purchase frozen beef or chicken broth at the Lamb Shoppe.
  • Take a vitamin D supplement regularly and bump up the dosage if you are sick.

 

 

6. Remember, getting sick sometimes is good for “house cleaning” the body.

A healthy person actually does get sick from time to time. It is the body’s way of getting rid of toxins and wastes that the body needs to remove. So if you do get sick once in a while, use this time to cleanse and build.

 

7. Take Elderberry.

Whether it is a tincture, syrup, or tea, Elderberries are an incredible multi-purpose herb that is known for its effectiveness when used at the first stages of cold, flu, and upper respiratory congestion. In a number of studies, Elderberries have shown to significantly reduce the time of being sick from colds and flu.

 

 

Easy Therapeutic Tea Recipes

 

Best Remedy from the Orient: Basic Ginger Tea

In both Ayurvedic and Traditional Chinese medicine, ginger is considered the best home remedy for colds. Drink a cup of ginger tea several times (at least 3 times) a day.

To make a tea:

  1. add 1 heaping teaspoon of grated fresh gingerroot to 1 cup of boiled water.
  2. Allow to steep for 10 minutes.
  3. If you use dried ginger powder use 1/3 to 1/2 teaspoon of powdered ginger per cup.

 

Extra-Kick Ginger Tea

  1. Grate a one-inch piece of peeled ginger root.
  2. Place in a pot with 2 cups of water and cover, bring to nearly a boil, lower heat and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  3. Add ½ t. of cayenne pepper and simmer for one more minute.
  4. Remove from heat.
  5. Add 2T. fresh lemon juice, one or two cloves of mashed garlic and honey to take.
  6. Let cool slightly, and strain if you wish.

Chinese Tea (To induce a sweat)

Simmer the following herbs together with water for 15 minutes:

  • Ginger Root
  • Cinnamon Stick
  • Coriander Seeds
  • Clove

 

 

 

Fall Farm Festival 2016

fall-farm-festivalSaturday, September 24th

9:30 am: Registration Begins – $5 for Adults, Children 16 & under FREE

10:00 am: Garden Medicine – Connie Karstens, MS -New ways to use healing plants from the garden

11:00 am: Therapy Dog Demonstration – Shelia Groskreutz & Kelli Dahlman

11:20 am: Learn About the Local Vendors!  

(Lisa Krengel, Health Nut Pantry, Litchfield Natural Food Co-op, Prairie Drifter Farm, Dan & Becky’s Market)

Noon – Lunch: Lamb Burgers, Lamb Dogs & More!

Farm Girl Fresh Author Talk Joyce Kaping & Colleen Anderson

1:00 pm: Overcoming Stress:  A Pathway to Health and Happiness – Dr. Chad J. Harrison from R & R Wellness Center

2:00 pm: Sheep Shearing Demonstration Doug Rathke – Watch a lost art & win prizes!

2:45 pm: Working Dog Herding Demonstration

3:00 pm: Pasture Hay Ride to the Crow River

All Day Attractions:

Farm Store, Local Vendors, Lawn Bowling, Free Drawings & Prizes, Pumpkin Ring Toss, Lawn Games, Farm Animals (Sheep, Chickens, Donkeys, Pony, Mule)

 

 

 

For Kids:

      11:30 am – Burlap Sack Races

      11:45 am – Egg Toss

 

 

 

About the Speakers:

Connie Karstens, MS

Connie Karstens, MS, Herbalist and Health Educator, combines updated research and knowledge with traditional wisdom of herbs and nutrition to help restore, develop and maintain optimal health and well being. Connie is a 3rd generation natural healer. She holds a degree in Biology, a Masters of Science in Nutrition Education, and taught college nutrition for 14 years before opening her own wellness center in 2005.  She incorporates whole foods nutrition, herbs, stress management techniques, and other natural remedies to support and build overall health and re-balance the body.

 

Dr. Chad J. Harrison

Dr. Chad J. Harrison is a leader in developing and implementing unique and powerful healing strategies.  He received a Bachelor’s of Science from Concordia College (Moorhead, MN) and a Doctor of Chiropractic from Northwestern Health Science University, and has extensive training in Applied Kinesiology and Nutrition.  Dr. Chad has dedicated his career to educating and helping others achieve greater health.  He currently practices in Minnesota, where he lives with his wife, Lisa, and two children, Riley and Britton.

 

Joyce Kaping

Joyce is a true farm girl at heart. She enjoys growing her own food and creating recipes around the fruits and vegetables harvested from her organic garden. Joyce’s passion is to teach people how to grow, preserve and prepare healthy food for family and friends, along with sharing insight on healthy living. Her favorite times are spent with her husband, Ross, and their family, which includes 12 grandchildren.

 

Colleen Anderson

Colleen grew up on a farm, learning the basics of gardening, cooking, canning and freezing from her mother. She came to realize the value of that teaching over the years as her family encountered health challenges. Colleen is passionate to share with others and to help promote healthy lifestyle choices through nutritious eating. She is married to Scott, an organic crop farmer. They have three married children and two grandsons.

Lamb’s Quarters…A Delicious, Nutritious Wild Edible

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Latin Name: Chenopodium album

About the Plant: This annual belongs to the spinach and beet family.  A very common wild edible found in backyards, vacant lots, overgrown fields, and along roadsides. It is easy to identify, nutritious and delicious. Lamb ’s Quarters is dusted with a white powdery substance which is perfectly safe to eat.

Parts Used: Tender young shoots, leaves and tips, and seeds.

Leaves:  One of the best tasting and most nutritious wild foods available. Use fresh in salads and sandwiches.  Young leaves and stems are excellent steamed, sautéed and cooked.  Leaves are often eaten in place of spinach in dishes like omelets, quiche, and lasagna.  Eat alone or throw in soups and stews, add to casseroles. Chop leaves for stir-fry or add to pizzas and lasagna. Blanch and freeze leaves for winter use. Leaves may also be dried. This plant is extremely versatile.  Make cookies, brownies, pancakes or pita cakes from Lamb’s Quarters.

Seeds:  Collect in late summer, autumn and early winter by stripping the seed-fruit clusters by hand into a container. Dry carefully to prevent mold or spoilage.  Rub the seed clusters between the palm of your hands to reveal the small, round black and dark brown seeds. Remove chaff.  Grain may be boiled to make as a breakfast cereal or ground into flour to mix with other flours.

TIPS: Do not pick plants with red stems as they may contain nitrates. You can dry the whole plant and grind it into a vitamin packed flour. Use the leaves to make green drinks and add to smoothies in the blender.

Nutrient Profile: Rich in Vitamin A, C, K. Calcium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Magnesium, and Manganese

Why I Love Creeping Charlie…

Creeping Charlie 

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Many people hate the sight of Creeping Charlie (Glechoma hederacea) will do anything to try to eradicate it. It is often considered an invasive weed that runs amok. But when I see this low growing plant with kidney-shaped leaves and beautiful, funnel-shaped, bluish-violet flowers in the spring, it makes me think of all the amazing medicinal uses it has.

European settlers intentionally brought Creeping Charlie to America for its culinary and medicinal uses. A member of the mint family, the herb forms long trailing stems that create a dense mat over the ground. Another common name for this plant is Ground Ivy.

Historically, it has a rich background and was even used in beer making as a clarifying agent to improve flavor before hops were used. It was also used by painters as a remedy for lead colic. Mostly, it was used as a tonic. Since Creeping Charlie is extremely rich in vitamin C, it was often made into a tea and used to prevent scurvy.

Parts used: Flowers, stems, leaves.

Medicinal Uses: Both Internal and external.

  • Soothes inflamed mucous membranes
  • Sinusitis
  • used for inner and middle ear remedy
  • tinnitus (ringing in the ears
  • kidney and lung disorder
  • head colds, especially with congestion in ear tubes
  • bronchitis and viral pneumonia
  • cough remedy
  • bladder infections
  • indigestion
  • may be useful for heavy metal detoxification (lead, mercury, aluminum)
  • traditional cancer remedy
  • Externally used as a wash or poultice for sores, cuts, bruises and ear or nasal infections

Systems Supported: Kidney, bladder, respiratory, lymphatic, and digestive.

Plant Preparations: Infusion (tea), tincture, poultice.

Minerals/Vitamins: Iron, copper, iodine, phosphorus, potassium. Rich in Vitamin C.

Herbal Actions: Anti-catarrhal – Anti-inflammatory – Antiviral – Astringent – Diaphoretic – Diuretic – Expectorant 

 

RECIPE: Creeping Charlie Tea

IMG_2561Because this plant runs so rampant, one way to embrace and use Creeping Charlie is to make an herbal infusion. It has a pleasantly subtle mint-like flavor.

Infusions are a great way to build health. Just think of them as a gentle tonic for the body. Tonic herbs are beneficial to the body and they can either increase or decrease the activity of a system, as needed. Some tonic herbs have an overall affect on several bodily systems, while others address a narrow range of processes. Herbal teas are easy to prepare and nurturing to sip.

How To Make It…
  1. Pick enough plant material to loosely fill a quart jar.
  2. Thoroughly wash the Creeping Charlie.
  3. Place the plant material in a quart jar.
  4. Fill to top with boiling water.
  5. Cover jar and steep for one hour.
  6. Remove plant material and drink either hot or cold.
  7. Optional: Add lemon or lime slices with a sprig of fresh mint.

Combat Seasonal Allergies with Quercetin Rich Foods

Using Foods as Medicine:

Foods with the Most Quercetin

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You may have heard of quercetin, but you probably don’t know exactly what it is or why you may need it. Well, let’s discuss the basics and find out why it is important to consume if you have seasonal allergies.

 

Quercetin is a natural occurring substance that is found in plant pigments called flavonoids that give many fruits, flowers, and vegetables their colors. It is known to inhibit the release of histamine which is said to be responsible for the symptoms of allergies in addition to having antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

 

Top Choices of foods rich in quercetin:

Vegetables (mg/100 g)

  • Capers. Just one tablespoon contains 180 milligrams. Add capers to soups, salads, pasta dishes and dips
  • Radish Leaves. We all know the radish roots are great to eat, but did you know that the greens make a delicious soup too? So do not throw out the radish tops if they look good, put them in a pot with chicken broth instead, add seasonings, blend and enjoy because they contain 70.37 mg of quercetin.
  • Hot Wax Yellow Peppers. Eaten raw you will get 50.63 milligrams.
  • Onions. The raw red onions contain the most quercetin with 33.4 milligrams.

Fresh Herbs (mg/100 g)

  • Lovage leaves. This is loaded with 170 milligrams. Lovage looks like a massive Italian parsley plant. Many lovage lovers make this savory soup, but you can use it similarly to parsley too.
  • Dill weed. (55.15 mg)
  • Cilantro. (52.9 mg)
  • Fennel leaves. (48.8 mg) 

Fruits & Berries (mg/100g) 

  • Elderberries. (raw berries 42 mg, concentrated juice 106.16 mg)
  • Cranberries. (raw 15.09 mg) 

Wild Edibles (mg/100g)

  • Yellow Dock Leaves. This wild edible is great to find in the early spring. It has a lemon like flavor and contains 86.20 milligrams of quercetin. Come to our Wild Edible Workshop & Dinner and discover this gem growing locally.
  • Chokeberry. (68.17 mg)
  • Bee Pollen. (20.95 mg)

Grains (mg/100g)

  • Buckwheat ranks as the top grain with 23.09 mg. This is not surprising since it is a relative of Yellow Dock.

 

Lovage Soup Recipe

 

Cook with lovage for more quercetin.

Lovage is one of those garden herbs that are bold and strong growing. It looks like a huge Italian parsley plant and has flavors that also mimic parsley or celery. It survives the cold Minnesota winters and comes back each year with force.

This garden herb is one of the richest sources of quercetin.

Quercetin is a natural occurring substance that is found in plant pigments called flavonoids that give many fruits, flowers, and vegetables their colors. It is known to inhibit the release of histamine which is said to be responsible for the symptoms of allergies in addition to having antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

 

Fresh Lovage

Fresh Lovage

Here is a fabulous lovage soup recipe.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 bunch green onions, chopped or wild leeks
  • 1 medium red or yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 quarts chicken stock
  • 5 medium Yukon Gold potatoes, chopped
  • 1 cup lovage leaves, chopped
  • heavy cream (to serve)

Instructions

  1. Melt the butter in a heavy-bottomed stock pot over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and stir in onions. Fry until translucent, about five minutes.
  2. Pour in chicken stock and stir in chopped potatoes. Simmer, covered, until potatoes are tender, about 20 to 30 minutes.
  3. Stir in lovage and simmer, covered, a further five or six minutes.
  4. Remove from heat and blend with an immersion blender until smooth.
  5. Season with unrefined sea salt and freshly ground pepper.
  6. Stir in a spoonful of heavy cream and serve.

Have You Heard the Buzz on Bitters?

bittersOur modern diets are unquestionably very different from that of our ancestors. One of the traditional old world remedies for a myriad of health conditions was that of consuming bitter herbs just before or with meals. Today, however, people in America reach for Priolosec, Nexium or Prevacid for comparative digestive complaints. If you are looking for natural approach to digestive wellness consider using bitter tonics like those found at The Lamb Shoppe.

Top reasons you should be using bitters:

  • Bitters support healthy liver and gall bladder function
  • Bitters balance appetite and sugar cravings
  • Bitters may offer relief from heartburn and acid reflux by encouraging HCL production
  • Bitters may soothe and upset stomach from gas and bloating
  • Bitters help balance blood sugar levels
  • Bitters increase absorption of vitamins A, D, E & K
  • Bitters assist to normalize the bowels
  • Bitters may improve skin conditions due to better digestion
  • Bitters are considered a gentle liver detoxifier and blood tonic