The Power of 3 Kitchen Spices

Believe it or not, in ancient times, spices were often more precious than gold. There were wars over them, kingdoms lost over them, and new frontiers discovered because of spices.

You can harness the healing power of spices by strategically adding them to your meals. Spices can be medicines. Writings in ancient medical texts dating back 3000 years showed how spices like turmeric, cinnamon, coriander, cloves, ginger, pepper were used for therapeutic value.

CINNAMON

This sweet-spicy flavored spice is derived from the bark of a tropical evergreen tree. Here is a brief overview of its medicinal qualities.

cinnamon sticks

Cinnamon

 

  • Lowers blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes
  • Reduces triglycerides levels
  • Mildly reduces LDL (bad) cholesterol
  • Supports digestion by reducing gas, bloating, etc
  • Tones and constricts tissues. Good for varicose veins
  • Relieves congestion
  • Helps with menstrual discomforts
  • Contains anti-inflammatory proprieties that help arthritis
  • Contains blood thinning compounds that stimulate circulation & promote heart health
  • Prevents urinary tract infections
  • Prevents tooth decay and gum disease (why do you think it is in so many toothpastes?)
  • Promotes fresh breath
  • Helps control Metabolic syndrome (AKA insulin resistance syndrome and syndrome X)
  • Induces sweating with colds/flus

NUTMEG

This spice was first imported to the state of Connecticut in the 18th Century, where only the wealthy could afford it. If you haven’t done it yet, buy a whole nutmeg and grate a little fresh on foods for a delightful flavor and added nutrition. The Lamb Shoppe has this delicious spice available in the Bulk Herb Section of the store. NOTE: TAKE IN LOWER AMOUNTS ONLY (less than 2 ounces), it may cause narcotic reactions if taken in large amounts.

Grated nutmeg and whole seed

  • Insomnia – eating enough of this herb may produce drowsiness, so eat it in the evening for a good night’s sleep
  • Anxiety remedy
  • Calms muscle spasms and pain
  • Helps nausea and vomiting
  • Good for indigestion by reducing gas and bloating
  • Alleviates diarrhea
  • Relieves joint pain and gout
  • Helps lower blood pressure
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Improves memory and concentration
  • Improves male infertility and impotence
  • May be good for fibromyalgia pain

 

STAR ANISE

Star anise

This spice comes from an evergreen tree in China and is greatly admired for its beauty. It has a 6 or 8-pointed star of slender pods, each cradling a seed. It not only looks beautiful, it tastes of a lovely licorice flavor with a hint of cinnamon and clove. This spice is 13 times sweeter than sugar, but is often used in savory recipes, particularly with meats. In China, which has used it for centuries, star anise is a key ingredient in five-spice powder (with cloves, cinnamon, fennel and Sichuan peppercorns). One whole star is enough to aromatize a vegetable stir fry dish.  When simmered with onions and soy sauce or tamari, it add a nice flare to beef, chicken and lamb.

  • Relieves gas, cramping, bloating and indigestion
  • Used in traditional Chinese medicine for clearing mucus from the respiratory tract
  • Fights influenza
  • Wards off viral, bacterial and fungal infections including Hepatitis B., Herpes simplex 1, HIV, Stept bacteria, Epstein-Barr virus and more.

Here are a few ideas in case this spice is new to you:

  1. Put a star anise in the pan when roasting a chicken.
  2. Add star anise to stewed apples or plums.
  3. Use it in soups, stews, and casseroles that require long cooking times.
  4. Use it to flavor teas.
  5. Grind it and add to a marinade.

Hint: I like to add one dried star anise pod and one slice of a fresh orange to a glass of water, and let sit for about 30 minutes before drinking it.  The water becomes infused with the spice and citrus flavor for a refreshing change of pace in beverages. Make a pitcher of this, for serving when entertaining, your guests will be delighted. The Lamb Shoppe has this spice and many more in the bulk herb section.

Note: This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice from your professional healthcare provider. Please consult your qualified healthcare provider for treatment of medical problems.

Job Opening

Lamb Shoppe, LLC & Wellness Center

Now Hiring

 

Shoppe Assistant, Part-time

(12-15 hours/week)

 

Hours mainly include: Mondays, Fridays & some Saturdays.

 

Responsibilities:

  • Customer Service
  • Cashiering
  • Stocking Shelves
  • Light Cleaning
  • Harvesting & Caretaking Produce in Green House/Garden

 Desired Skills:

  • Phone Etiquette
  • Interest in Health & Nutrition
  • Interest in Gardening
  • People Orientated
  • Communication Skills

Please Call 320-587-6094 or email info@LambShoppe.com for more details. 
Stop in the shoppe during business hours to pick up an application.

Soothing Herbal Cough Syrup

 

Herbal Cough Syrup

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 Quart filtered water (Distilled water has a longer shelf life)
  • ¼ c. Thyme leaf, dried
  • ¼ c. Mullein leaf, dried
  • ¼ c. Marshmallow root, dried
  • ¼ c. Slippery Elm bark, dried
  • ¼ c. Chamomile flowers, dried
  • ¼ c  Ginger root, dried
  • ¼ c. Anise Seed
  • ¼ c. Hyssop, dried
  • 3 sticks Cinnamon
  • Raw Honey (1 cup or more)  Manuka Honey is even better, if you have it.
  • Essential Oils are optional

DIRECTIONS

  1. In a saucepan, combine water, and herbs. Bring to a boil and reduce down to simmer for 20 minutes.
  2. After 20 minutes, remove from heat and strain herbs with unbleached cheesecloth. Be sure to squeeze out the herbs to get all of the herbal liquid.
  3. Combine herbal liquid with honey. Heat slightly to dissolve honey if needed.
  4. Allow to cool on the counter top before putting a lid on and storing in the fridge. Will keep in the fridge for 4-6 weeks.
  5. Add a small amount of brandy, if desired, to help preserve the syrup and act as a relaxant.

TO USE: Safe for use in children 2 years and over. Dosage: 1/2 tsp for children and 1 teaspoon for adults every 3-4 hours as needed while symptoms persist. 

Herbs for Winter Health

This winter it seems colds, flus, respiratory issues are hitting many people hard. So here are a seven tips for prevention and also helpful tools if you do get sick so the illness will move through much faster. Be sure to try the easy tea recipes too.

 

1. Eat Warming & Nourishing Foods

As a preventative measure, we first need to look to “winter” types of foods that will nourish our body so it can take care of itself.  These are “warming and nurturing” things to eat to help keep you healthy everyday.

Look for foods rich in vitamin A, C including:
  • root vegetables (carrots, parsnips, beets, etc.)
  • squash & pumpkins
  • brassicas (turnips, cabbage, kale, etc.)
  • greens
  • citrus fruits and rosehips, lemons

 

Eat food from the allium family.

These are vegetables are that are high in sulfur:

  • leeks
  • onion
  • garlic

 

Add warming spices:
  • Ginger
  • Curry
  • Cayenne
  • Turmeric
  • Cinnamon
  • Cardamom

 

2. Use Astragalus.

It is a sweet and mild Chinese root used as an herbal tonic that can be used to build up your resistance. You can find this as a tincture or as a dried herb in the bulk section at the Lamb Shoppe.

We suggest adding the dried root to a pot of soup or when making bone broth. Astragalus nourishes both the spleen and the lungs

 

3. Calendula Flowers.

Thus is another great item to throw in soups and stews. This herb is traditionally used as an anti-depressant and for people with SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder). It is also an excellent herbal for the lymphatic system. Calendula makes a great ointment and salve and is an effective remedy for chapped skins and lips. The Lamb Shoppe has dried Calendula blossoms in the bulk herb section of the store.

 

4. Use Sprigs of Pine, Juniper, Cedar & Sage to Simmer on Stove.

Just having these simple plants simmer on the stove top will freshen and clear the air of germs. Steam inhalations of these plants can be beneficial for relieving congestion in coughs and colds. You can also add a few drops of the essential oil to hot water, place your face over the bowl, cover with a towel, and inhale the steam.

 

5. Build immunity through nutrition and balancing the body.

  • Always work toward avoiding sugar and commercially processed foods.
  • Consume bone broth. You can make your own or purchase frozen beef or chicken broth at the Lamb Shoppe.
  • Take a vitamin D supplement regularly and bump up the dosage if you are sick.

 

 

6. Remember, getting sick sometimes is good for “house cleaning” the body.

A healthy person actually does get sick from time to time. It is the body’s way of getting rid of toxins and wastes that the body needs to remove. So, if you do get sick once in a while, use this time to cleanse and build.

 

7. Take Elderberry.

Whether it is a tincture, syrup, or tea, Elderberries are an incredible multi-purpose herb that is known for its effectiveness when used at the first stages of cold, flu, and upper respiratory congestion. In a number of studies, Elderberries have shown to significantly reduce the time of being sick from colds and flu.

 

 

Easy Therapeutic Tea Recipes

 

Best Remedy from the Orient: Basic Ginger Tea

In both Ayurvedic and Traditional Chinese medicine, ginger is considered the best home remedy for colds. Drink a cup of ginger tea several times (at least 3 times) a day.

To make a tea:

  1. Add 1 heaping teaspoon of grated fresh gingerroot to 1 cup of boiled water.
  2. Allow to steep for 10 minutes.
  3. If you use dried ginger powder use 1/3 to 1/2 teaspoon of powdered ginger per cup.

 

Extra-Kick Ginger Tea

  1. Grate a one-inch piece of peeled ginger root.
  2. Place in a pot with 2 cups of water and cover, bring to nearly a boil, lower heat and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  3. Add ½ t. of cayenne pepper and simmer for one more minute.
  4. Remove from heat.
  5. Add 2T. fresh lemon juice, one or two cloves of mashed garlic and honey to take.
  6. Let cool slightly, and strain if you wish.

Chinese Tea (To induce a sweat)

Simmer the following herbs together with water for 15 minutes:

  • Ginger Root
  • Cinnamon Stick
  • Coriander Seeds
  • Clove

 

 

 

Become a Home Herbalist

A 9-Month Educational Program

 Learn how to create your own herbal products for yourself and your family. Herbalist & Holistic Health Educator, Connie Karstens, MS will instruct a nine-month intensive program that will empower you to become your own herbalist. This series of classes takes you through the seasons so you can prepare an entire apothecary of safe, gentle and effective herbal products.

This program will include a solid foundation for plant identification, wild food foraging, numerous preparation techniques, and knowledge on proper usage. By the end of the class, not only will you have stocked your own botanical pharmacy, but you will know and understand how and why to use the herbal preparations that you have created.

This is a rare opportunity for hands-on learning and gathering plants with a local herbal practitioner. Sign up today to become a part of this amazing program! Certificate of Completion awarded at last class.

 

2018 Class Dates

All 12 classes are currently scheduled for Saturdays 9 am – 1 pm.

Most months have 1 class per month except May, June and July where there are 2 classes because of the abundance of plants to gather and make into preparations.

  • March 24
  • April 21
  • May 5 & 19
  • June 9 & 23
  • July 14 & 28
  • August 4
  • September 29
  • October 27
  • November 10
Details on the Course:

This course is essential for those wanting to take charge of their own health and who have a desire to become informed, educated and more independent.

The class will explore the historical roots of herbal medicine and will help you learn how to use botanical medicines for basic natural healthcare. The student will gain an understanding of simple herbal aids for many common ailments and first aid uses. This course will teach the basics of preparing herbal medicines in your own home. You will also learn about planning, planting and using your very own medicine garden.

You will learn about the following over the 9 -month course:

  • Fresh & Dried Tinctures
  • Bark Tinctures
  • Root Tinctures
  • Glycerite Tinctures
  • Medicinal Herbal Wines
  • Medicinal Herbal Syrups
  • Medicinal Herbal Teas
  • Herbal Pastilles
  • Herbal Lozenges
  • Medicinal Vinegars
  • Herbal Infused Honeys
  • Herbal Oxymels
  • Drying Herbs & Storing Herbs
  • Freezing Herbs
  • Make a “Green Jar”
  • Poultices
  • Compresses
  • Liniments
  • Oil Infusions
  • Salves & Ointments and Formulas
  • Herbal Hydrotherapy & Formulas
  • How to Use Specific Herbs for Organ Systems
  • Herbal Actions & Corresponding Herbs
  • Learning Basic Tongue Indications
  • Facial Analysis Foundations
  • Organ System Emotional Relationships
  • We will touch on Pulse Testing
  • How to Put It All Together to Select Herb for Common Aliments
  • Using Herbs Safely

This course will require some independent work and research. Along with quizzes, presentations and group collaboration, there will be a great deal of hands-on learning.

By the end of the class, your will have well over 50 herbal preparations for your own personal herbal pharmacy. Plus, the knowledge on how to safely and effectively use every preparation that you made.

As a bonus, you will become well-informed on how to wild forage with common plants in the local area. We will do much hands-on collecting of plants for medicine and food.

If this class sounds like a match for you, do not delay. Sign up today and reserve your spot! The first 20 students will fill the class quickly.

 

Program Instruction Cost:
  • Deposit of $50 to hold your spot due 1/1/18
  • Total of $975 (check or cash only), due 3/1/18
  • Add $25 for credit card payments

 

 THIS CLASS IS CURRENTLY FULL

If there is enough interest, we will offer it again next year. Thank you for the support.

 

Registration Form - Become a Home Herbalist

 

Meet Our New Employee


Hello!  My name is Rachel Cooley.  I’m thrilled to be part of the team at the Lamb Shoppe! 

 Holistic living has always interested me. I feel very fortunate to be able to expand my knowledge by working in an environment that’s in alignment with my beliefs.

 Not too long ago I left the healthcare field after being in it for almost 25 years. After graduating from high school I attended nursing school and worked as a nursing assistant in nursing homes for 6 years. It was a very rewarding job. I especially enjoyed hearing the elderly share their life lessons. Unfortunately all the heavy lifting took a toll on my body so decided to switch gears and become a medical transcriptionist. 

 I worked as a medical transcriptionist for 17 years. The changes I saw during that time were dramatic. My first jobs were at the clinic and hospital in Hutchinson. It was nice to be able to work from home and know I was still helping people indirectly. There was always research to be done and new things to learn since the medical field kept evolving. Speech recognition technology greatly reduced the amount of physician dictation needing to be typed and eventually the transcription department was entirely outsourced. I accepted a job with the outsourcing company and worked my way up their corporate ladder even though I was still often asked to assist with transcribing physician dictations.  

 The last few years my job title was quality assurance specialist and mentor. As a quality assurance specialist I would review medical records and report any transcription errors found. It was disheartening to constantly find errors in reports. It was also difficult to see American transcriptionists out of work at times while more and more physician dictations were being transcribed overseas. At least I occasionally got a break from that part of my job to do mentoring sessions. 

Most of the mentoring I did was trying to help transcriptionists meet their quality and production goals. They needed to maintain a high level of accuracy to ensure patient safety and still produce a certain amount of work in order to keep their jobs. This type of mentoring was very challenging because often when one aspect would improve the other would deteriorate. Quality should always be more important than quantity in the medical field but that doesn’t seem to be the priority anymore.  I definitely didn’t have all the answers for those I mentored but found they felt better if I’d just listen, offer validation and help them develop steps to try to reach their goals.  Mentoring also helped me realize how much I missed helping people directly.

Another thing I realized working in the medical field all those years was how much I didn’t agree with how patients were being treated. It seems patients aren’t always properly diagnosed and are rarely cured. Symptoms get addressed but treatment often just produces more problems. I’ve experienced this myself firsthand multiple times.  In my opinion we’re better off treating ourselves with natural remedies like our ancestors did and take an honest look at our nutritional intake and evaluate how well we’re taking care of ourselves on a routine basis. I often think of myself as a work in progress and just try to do better every day. 

On a more personal level, I’d like to share that I’ve been living in Hutchinson for the last 20 years. I’m originally from New Ulm, Minnesota. My husband, Dennis, is too.  We have 2 children together.  Anthony is 20 years old and Harmony is 10.  We also have 2 fur babies.  Lucky, our cat, is about 13 years old.  Luna is a 1-year-old Siberian Husky. 

I really enjoy spending time with my family. Most days I either walk or bike several miles with Luna. Spring is definitely my favorite season as I love to be outdoors. Foraging is something I’ve really grown fond of. This year I’ve found well over a hundred morel mushrooms, 2 patches of wild asparagus and lots of ramps (wild onions). All 3 items fried in butter with a little salt is so delicious! My family will forage with me but I think they would rather go fishing. 

Kayaking, swimming, hiking, gardening, birding, reading, writing, creating art, meditating and playing the piano are other things I really enjoy doing. I’ve also been told I take way too many pictures, which is probably true. I just see beauty in everything and want to savor the memories!

Thanks for taking the time to get to know me a little bit. I hope I’ll get to know you too!

 

5 AMAZING USES FOR DANDELIONS

Rather than being frustrated with Dandelions invading your lawn this year, why not embrace them? They offer amazing medicinal properties and are tasty wild food too. In case you didn’t know, European settles came to America with Dandelion seeds in hand because they didn’t want to miss out of not having this precious plant with them in the New World. We have our forefathers to thank for this golden treasure. As a child, I remember my grandfather religiously made Dandelion wine for one of his health tonics.

 

So, what exactly should you do with the multitude of Dandelions? To start with, only harvest Dandelions from lawns that have not been sprayed in several years. Stay away from high traffic areas where there may be contamination from pets or other offenders. If all else fails, you can purchase the greens at your local food coop. However, in my opinion, that takes the fun out of the “hunt”.

 

Five Ways to Use the Dandelion:

 

1. Pick and eat the young leaves for a spring tonic.

The tender young spring leaves are loaded with calcium, vitamin C, vitamin K1, potassium, magnesium and beta-carotene. Simply add leaves to your salad if you are new to wild foods as they have a pleasant bitter flavor. The bitter flavor detected by your tongue starts and entire cascade of events happening in your body. Digestive benefits begin to take place. Firstly, the bitterness of the greens causes your body to increase the saliva flow which, in turn, breaks down carbohydrates. Protein digestion is aided by increased HCL production in your stomach and fat digestion benefits by increased bile flow from the gallbladder and liver. All of these reactions are a result of that bitter flavor of the Dandelion leaf. The Dandelion leaf also acts as a diuretic. In other words, they will help you remove excess fluids and dampness from your body. By either making a tea from the leaves or eating the greens, you can experience the diuretic properties of this plant.

2. Eat the flowers.

Dandelion fritter flowers are a classic for wild food enthusiasts. It is both fun to collect the flowers and easy to do as an appetizer or snack that the whole family will love. This recipe has two variations: sweet or savory.

Dandelion Fritter Flowers Recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 cups of fresh picked (washed) dandelion flower
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups milk

Instructions

  1. Mix the milk, flour and eggs and beat until blended well.
  2. Warm some olive oil in a skillet on the stove (keep at medium heat).
  3. Holding the underneath of the flowers, dip into the batter until totally covered in the fritter batter then place into skillet, flower side down.
  4. Once they are brown, flip and brown the other side. If need be, continue flipping until the batter coating is light brown.
  5. Remove from oil and allow excess oil to soak onto a towel or paper towel.
  6. Eat plain or drizzle with maple syrup, honey, or even roll them in icing sugar while they are still warm. Best eaten right away.

Two Variations

For sweet: add one tablespoon of honey (or to taste) plus 1/2 teaspoon to 2 teaspoons total of the following herbs: cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, nutmeg.

For savory: add a pinch of thyme, rosemary, oregano or other savory herbs. You may also want to add another dash of salt.

3. Make the flowers into a relaxing massage oil.

Dandelion oil can be used to relieve muscle stiffness or achy joints. It’s really easy to make. Just fill a small mason jar with fresh dandelion flowers. Pour the oil over the dandelion flowers and fill the jar to the top. Cover with a lid and let sit in a dark, cool spot for 6 weeks. Strain the dandelion flowers out of the oil with cheese cloth and transfer the oil to a new clean jar. Store it in a cool dark place. If you put it in the refrigerator, it should last well over a year.

 

 

4. Build your bones with Dandelion shoots, roots and leaves infused in apple cider vinegar.

Dandelion infused vinegar is filled with minerals, especially calcium, boron and other bone building essentials. Use the vinegar for making salad dressings, taking shots, or adding a couple of teaspoons to your drinking water. This is one of THE best ways to get good vitamins and minerals for healthy bones.

Dandelion Infused Vinegar

Ingredients

  • 1 large jar with lid
  • As many Dandelions (shoots, root and leaves) as will fit in the jar
  • Organic apple cider vinegar

Instructions

  1. Thoroughly wash the Dandelion leaves, and scrub the dandelion roots, then chop both into medium size pieces.
  2. Fill a large jar with Dandelion parts.
  3. Pour the vinegar until the dandelions are covered.
  4. Shake well, and leave in a cupboard for six weeks.
  5. Strain through an unbleached coffee filter or cheese cloth into clean, sterilized jars.

5. Eat the stems to cleanse the gall bladder and balance blood sugar.

In Maria Treben’s book, Health through God’s Pharmacy, she talks about how good Dandelions are for disorders of the pancreas, liver, gall, spleen and blood. Maria encourages eating 10 fresh Dandelion stems for 3 weeks to reduce blood sugar levels, act as a gall bladder cleanse for stones, and for gout, rheumatism and to improve skin conditions.

The stems are chewed slowly and will taste bitter to start with, but only get better the longer you chew them.

Garlic Mustard: A Wild Food Gem

Why You Should Forage

and Eat Garlic Mustard…

Alliaria petiolata

 

Garlic mustard is a biennial member of the mustard family and is considered an invasive weed, but a tasty one. As its name indicates, it has a garlicky flavor. It has low growing, kidney-shaped leaves that appear in early spring. But, by mid-spring, a taller flower stalk shoots up and bears white flowers.

This history of this plant is interesting as it is a native to Europe and Africa. It was brought to the New World in 1868 and was planted in New York. Since that time it has spread across America and is considered very invasive. This plant will overtake an area if not controlled so harvesting it helps. As with all wild foods, start out eating it slowly and do not overdo it if you are not used eating this way.

Garlic mustard is high in vitamins A,C, and E. It is rich in many trace minerals including potassium, calcium, magnesium, selenium, copper, iron and  manganese.

 

Parts Used: Young tender leaves, stalks and roots.

Leaves: Pick the tender young leaves in early spring and use mixed in salads, made into pesto, added to soups, sautéed, simmered or in sauces.

Flowering Shoot:  Pick the shoots when the flower bud is still unopened and still in a cluster.  The stalk is mild, juicy and thicker at this stage and can be eaten raw or cooked.  Added to other foods, Garlic mustard makes an excellent seasoning.

Flowers: These may be picked and added to salads or used as a garnish.

Roots: In the fall, roots may be dug, cleaned and used like Horseradish.

TIPS: Blanch and freeze for off-season use. The leaves may also be dried for winter use in soups and stews.

 

Garlic Mustard Pesto Recipe

Garlic Mustard Pesto (Makes about 1 cup)

  • 4 cups garlic mustard greens
  • 1/2 cup toasted walnuts
  • 1/2 cup finely grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Pulse the garlic mustard greens in a food processor with the walnuts, cheese, lemon juice, and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Then, with the motor running, slowly pour the oil through the spout.

Serve on meat, fish, pasta, or bread. Add to a sandwich for a little extra kick. Anything!

 

 

 

Natural Ways to Deal with Gout

Do you know someone who suffers from Gout?

Gout is a disease of uric acid processing and build up. Excess uric acid is converted to sodium urate crystals that settle into joints arid other tissues. Men are more often affected than women and there is some evidence suggesting it may be hereditary. The big toe is a common site for the buildup of urate crystals.

Symptoms include hot joints, inflamed and shiny in color. The body temperature may also rise in acute conditions. It can be very painful swelling of a joint, along with chills and fever. If left unaddressed, it can lead to joint breakdown.

 

Nutrition Support Protocol

Lifestyle Recommendations:

  • Make weight reduction a priority; maintain a healthy body weight.
  • Exercise daily; avoid a sedentary lifestyle.
  • Reduce alcohol intake, particularly beer; stop smoking and increase hydration with plenty of purified water.
  • Moderate consumption of organic coffee may be helpful as coffee may lower uric acid levels.
  • Be aware of potential hypertension or cholesterol issues, which are associated health concerns.
  • Review all current medications while treating gout.
  • Manage stress and reduce excess obligations and any sources of chronic negativity.

 

Dietary Tips:

  • Identify and eliminate any food allergens or intolerances to reduce inflammation.
  • Avoid high fructose corn syrup (especially from sodas and juices) and any refined sugar.
  • Avoid all vegetable and industrial seed oils; avoid over-consuming omega-6 oils; use healthy oils such as olive, coconut, and avocado.
  • Avoid animal proteins that are particularly rich in purines, such as organ meats, shellfish, anchovies and sardines.
  • Eat fewer red meats; prioritize lean meats, cold water fish, and/or beans (if not intolerant).
  • Increase high fiber foods and food rich in magnesium and potassium such as bananas.
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Drink nettle tea.
  • Include apple cider vinegar and tart or black cherry juice in beverage choices; consider using tart cherry juice.

 

Herbs Most Helpful for Gout

  • Stinging Nettle tincture or tea
  • Celery Seed tincture or tea
  • Wild Cherry Bark tincture

Other Herbs to Consider

Tamarack, Black Cohosh, Chamomile, Dandelion, Gravel Root White Willow Bark, St. John’s Wort, Meadowsweet, Burdock Root, Goldenrod, Juniper.

 

Helpful Topical Ideas

  • Diluted essential oil options may include: sage, rosemary
  • Comfrey ointment
  • Epsom salt foot soaks or baths
  • Warm potato poultice

 

Supplements Helpful for Gout

 

Note: This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice from your professional healthcare provider. Please consult your qualified healthcare provider for treatment of medical problems.

ECHINACEA


Latin Name: Echinacea purpurea, E. augustifolia

About Echinacea:

Echinacea, or Purple Coneflower, is a popular garden plant that is also found growing wild.  It was originally named after the hedgehog (Echimus) because of its prickly, cone-like center. The flowers are long lasting and hardy. A favorite of the Native Americans and made popular in 1870 by Dr. H.C. F. Meyer in his original “snake oil” recipe, Echinacea is still widely used today for all kinds of infections. It was traditionally used by the Native Americans for fevers and wounds with difficulty healing.  Today it is widely used and recognized as an antibiotic remedy and immune booster.

This herb may be used external and internally.

How to grow: From seeds, root cuttings. Self-seed.

Safety: Overuse may elevate blood cell counts and diminish therapeutic effects. Do not use if you have autoimmune diseases.

Medicinal Preparations: Decoction, infusion, tincture, oil, salve, mouthwash

Taste: Sweet, cold, tingly, stimulating.
Harvest: Late Fall.
Parts used: Roots (3-4 years old).

MEDICINAL USES:

Immune System: Immune booster, blood cleanser, effective against bacteria and viruses, lymphatic congestion, raises white blood cell count, septic infections with purplish skin or veins, swollen lymph glands, fevers, measles, mumps, chicken pox, colds, flu, strep throat, staph infections, excess mucus, diphtheria, typhoid fever, meningitis.

Respiratory: Upper respiratory tract infections including tonsillitis, laryngitis and nose and sinus issues, bronchitis.

Skin: Acne, boils, carbuncles, abscesses, slow healing wounds, canker sores, eczema, hives.

First Aid: Bee stings, venomous bites, blood poisoning, septic sores and wounds, poison oak, poison ivy.

Digestion: Gastric disorders and ulcers, inflamed intestine.

Additional Uses: Enhances circulation, fatigue, exhaustion and for general “run down” feeling, mouthwash for gingivitis and pyorrhea, mouth sores, ear infection, gangrene.

 

HERBAL ACTIONS

  • Antibiotic
  • Anti-catarrhal
  • Anti-Inflammatory
  • Antiseptic
  • Antiviral
  • Lymphatic

Contains: Glycoside, isobutyalklamines, polyacetylenes, sesquiterpene, resin, volatile oils.

Note: This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice from your professional healthcare provider. Please consult your qualified healthcare provider for treatment of medical problems.